Wednesday, April 6, 2011
To go with yesterday’s post.  Unfortunately, Dick Pole was never traded.

To go with yesterday’s post.  Unfortunately, Dick Pole was never traded.

Monday, April 4, 2011
This is the biggest tree we’ve done so far, on par the Goose Gossage tree.  This one has 11 generations and 42 resultant players from Enos Slaughter.  Gossage had 10 generations and 42 players.
Slaughter was traded from the Cardinals to the Yankees in 1954.  The last player I saw in this tree to be playing was Lou Brock in 1979 - a 25 year span.  Slaughter, himself a Hall of Famer, spawned two more in Hoyt Wilhelm and Lou Brock.  While Brock is known mostly as a Cardinal, Wilhelm only spent part of 1957 there before being claimed off of waivers by the Indians.

This is the biggest tree we’ve done so far, on par the Goose Gossage tree.  This one has 11 generations and 42 resultant players from Enos Slaughter.  Gossage had 10 generations and 42 players.

Slaughter was traded from the Cardinals to the Yankees in 1954.  The last player I saw in this tree to be playing was Lou Brock in 1979 - a 25 year span.  Slaughter, himself a Hall of Famer, spawned two more in Hoyt Wilhelm and Lou Brock.  While Brock is known mostly as a Cardinal, Wilhelm only spent part of 1957 there before being claimed off of waivers by the Indians.

@stern_daniel tweeted us, asking:

how about Jeff Kent? He had some good trades early in his career between the Mets, Blue Jays, Indians & Giants

Kent has been traded three times in his career.  He was traded from the Blue Jays to the Mets straight up for David Cone.  That’s the entire tree, pretty uninteresting.  His trade from the Indians to the Giants is a sub-tree in the Joe Carter Tree from last week.  That just leaves his trade from the Mets to the Indians.
The interesting part of this tree is Kent and Vizcaino were traded together from the Mets to the Indians, and then were again traded together from the Indians to Giants.  From 1994 to 1997, Kent and Vizcaino were teammates on three separate teams.

@stern_daniel tweeted us, asking:

how about Jeff Kent? He had some good trades early in his career between the Mets, Blue Jays, Indians & Giants

Kent has been traded three times in his career.  He was traded from the Blue Jays to the Mets straight up for David Cone.  That’s the entire tree, pretty uninteresting.  His trade from the Indians to the Giants is a sub-tree in the Joe Carter Tree from last week.  That just leaves his trade from the Mets to the Indians.

The interesting part of this tree is Kent and Vizcaino were traded together from the Mets to the Indians, and then were again traded together from the Indians to Giants.  From 1994 to 1997, Kent and Vizcaino were teammates on three separate teams.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011
A twitter request from Official Friend of Trade Trees™ @albolte:

Do a tree for the trade that destroyed my baseball innocence: Bret Saberhagen from KC to New York (NL).

Saberhagen joined the Royals in 1984, was a member of the ‘85 WS Champion team (Including starting and winning Game 7), and won 2 Cy Youngs (‘85 and ‘89). In 8 years in KC, Saberhagen won 110 games and struck out 1093 batter.  In December 1991, he was traded to the Mets, along with PECOTA!, for three players.
You’ll never believe this, but the Royals didn’t get much in return for Saberhagen. Coleman hit .259/.311/.364 with 76 SB in 179 games over a season and a half for KC.  That’s about all worth note in this tree.  The other players were spectacularly average, and not near appropriate return for a pitcher of Saberhagen’s caliber.  We’d like to extend our condolances to OFoTT™ albolte for this crushing his baseball innocence.
PS - You can also read albolte’s Tumblr here

A twitter request from Official Friend of Trade Trees™ @albolte:

Do a tree for the trade that destroyed my baseball innocence: Bret Saberhagen from KC to New York (NL).

Saberhagen joined the Royals in 1984, was a member of the ‘85 WS Champion team (Including starting and winning Game 7), and won 2 Cy Youngs (‘85 and ‘89). In 8 years in KC, Saberhagen won 110 games and struck out 1093 batter.  In December 1991, he was traded to the Mets, along with PECOTA!, for three players.

You’ll never believe this, but the Royals didn’t get much in return for Saberhagen. Coleman hit .259/.311/.364 with 76 SB in 179 games over a season and a half for KC.  That’s about all worth note in this tree.  The other players were spectacularly average, and not near appropriate return for a pitcher of Saberhagen’s caliber.  We’d like to extend our condolances to OFoTT™ albolte for this crushing his baseball innocence.

PS - You can also read albolte’s Tumblr here

Thursday, March 24, 2011
Earlier on Twitter, @woedoctor took a good-natured jab at us, saying, “I’m beginning to think that @tradetrees has something against Padres fans.” for featuring the Gary Sheffield and Ruben Rivera trades back-to-back.  I promised him we’d find something positive for the Padres fans out there.
Goose Gossage was signed by the Padres at the beginning of 1984, and was instrumental in the Padres’ 1984 NL pennant. After 4 years, he was traded to the Cubs.
After Gossage, there are 10 generations of players for the Padres - which I’m pretty sure is the deepest tree we’ve ever done.  A lot of familiar names pop up in this tree.  Finley and Caminiti would be on the Padres’ only other pennant winning team in 1998.  At the very end of the tree, we see Michael Barrett who was on the team as recently as 2008.
This is a very large tree, so I wouldn’t be surprised if I missed someone or incorrectly colored them.  Please let us know if you see something incorrect.  I hope @woedoctor and the rest of our readers who are Padres fans like this one.

Earlier on Twitter, @woedoctor took a good-natured jab at us, saying, “I’m beginning to think that @tradetrees has something against Padres fans.” for featuring the Gary Sheffield and Ruben Rivera trades back-to-back.  I promised him we’d find something positive for the Padres fans out there.

Goose Gossage was signed by the Padres at the beginning of 1984, and was instrumental in the Padres’ 1984 NL pennant. After 4 years, he was traded to the Cubs.

After Gossage, there are 10 generations of players for the Padres - which I’m pretty sure is the deepest tree we’ve ever done.  A lot of familiar names pop up in this tree.  Finley and Caminiti would be on the Padres’ only other pennant winning team in 1998.  At the very end of the tree, we see Michael Barrett who was on the team as recently as 2008.

This is a very large tree, so I wouldn’t be surprised if I missed someone or incorrectly colored them.  Please let us know if you see something incorrect.  I hope @woedoctor and the rest of our readers who are Padres fans like this one.

Here is a long-delayed reader request for George Bell and Sammy Sosa.  The trade going the other way, from the Cubs to the White Sox, was just Sosa-Bell, so that’s no good for us.

Here is a long-delayed reader request for George Bell and Sammy Sosa.  The trade going the other way, from the Cubs to the White Sox, was just Sosa-Bell, so that’s no good for us.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011
As requested yesterday, here’s Gary Sheffield being traded from Milwaukee to San Diego.  This is one of the largest trees we have featured here.  This one dovetails nicely with the Richie Sexson trade featured awhile back.

As requested yesterday, here’s Gary Sheffield being traded from Milwaukee to San Diego.  This is one of the largest trees we have featured here.  This one dovetails nicely with the Richie Sexson trade featured awhile back.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011
Bob Uecker is known for, in rough order, being an annoucer for the Brewers, begin Harry Doyle on Major League and on “Mr. Belvedere”, and being a catcher (and a bad one if you hear him tell it).  He played 6 years split among the Milwaukee Braves, Cardinals, Phillies, and the Braves again, this time in Atlanta.
I could bore you with the stats of all the players in this tree, but your time would be better used reading these quotes from Uecker.

Bob Uecker is known for, in rough order, being an annoucer for the Brewers, begin Harry Doyle on Major League and on “Mr. Belvedere”, and being a catcher (and a bad one if you hear him tell it).  He played 6 years split among the Milwaukee Braves, Cardinals, Phillies, and the Braves again, this time in Atlanta.

I could bore you with the stats of all the players in this tree, but your time would be better used reading these quotes from Uecker.

Friday, March 4, 2011
This tree is another of no real significance, but involves a favorite name of mine (see also: Benny Agbayani)  ”Shinjo” is a fun name to say, and the man himself had a bit of flair, in particular his bleached blonde hair.  Shinjo and Desi Relaford were packaged by the Mets and shipped to the Giants for Shawn Estes.  Estes was later traded with some cash to Cincinnati for four players (two were PTBNL).
Feliciano was claimed by the Tigers off waivers, but released and re-signed with the Mets.  Clark was claimed by the Brewers.  Gonzalez was released by the Mets, signed a free agent deal with them a month later, then was re-released 4 months after that.
Elvin Andujar is also known as Elvin Beltre.  He spent a year at the Mets’ Low-A club in Brooklyn, then was demoted to Rookie Ball.  He was released after two years.

This tree is another of no real significance, but involves a favorite name of mine (see also: Benny Agbayani)  ”Shinjo” is a fun name to say, and the man himself had a bit of flair, in particular his bleached blonde hair.  Shinjo and Desi Relaford were packaged by the Mets and shipped to the Giants for Shawn Estes.  Estes was later traded with some cash to Cincinnati for four players (two were PTBNL).

Feliciano was claimed by the Tigers off waivers, but released and re-signed with the Mets.  Clark was claimed by the Brewers.  Gonzalez was released by the Mets, signed a free agent deal with them a month later, then was re-released 4 months after that.

Elvin Andujar is also known as Elvin Beltre.  He spent a year at the Mets’ Low-A club in Brooklyn, then was demoted to Rookie Ball.  He was released after two years.

Thursday, March 3, 2011
Earlier today I posted a three-way trade and a teaser about today’s tree.  Can you see what I’m getting at?
Nick Swisher was drafted by the A’s in 2002 as compensation for losing Johnny Damon to the Red Sox.  Years later, they would be teammates as Yankees.  I haven’t cross-checked the database at all to see if this is a unique case.  I only noticed it because the lightbulb went off in my head when I entered in the data.  One big shiny Internet to anyone who can come up with another example.
Also, de los Santos spent 2010 at AA in the Oakland organization.  John Sickles rates him as the A’s #5 prospect coming into this spring.

Earlier today I posted a three-way trade and a teaser about today’s tree.  Can you see what I’m getting at?

Nick Swisher was drafted by the A’s in 2002 as compensation for losing Johnny Damon to the Red Sox.  Years later, they would be teammates as Yankees.  I haven’t cross-checked the database at all to see if this is a unique case.  I only noticed it because the lightbulb went off in my head when I entered in the data.  One big shiny Internet to anyone who can come up with another example.

Also, de los Santos spent 2010 at AA in the Oakland organization.  John Sickles rates him as the A’s #5 prospect coming into this spring.