Wednesday, May 25, 2011
Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda was Rookie of the Year in 1958 for the San Francisco Giants and MVP for the Cardinals in 1967, as well as being a 7-time All Star.  Over his 17 seasons, he played for 6 teams (SF, STL, ATL, OAK, BOS, and KCR).
The first time he was traded was from San Francisco to St. Louis for Ray Sadecki.  After 2+ years in St. Louis, during which he won his MVP, Cepeda was traded again, this time to the Braves for Joe Torre.  Ray Sadeki would end up back in St. Louis after Torre was traded away.

Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda was Rookie of the Year in 1958 for the San Francisco Giants and MVP for the Cardinals in 1967, as well as being a 7-time All Star.  Over his 17 seasons, he played for 6 teams (SF, STL, ATL, OAK, BOS, and KCR).

The first time he was traded was from San Francisco to St. Louis for Ray Sadecki.  After 2+ years in St. Louis, during which he won his MVP, Cepeda was traded again, this time to the Braves for Joe Torre.  Ray Sadeki would end up back in St. Louis after Torre was traded away.

Friday, May 13, 2011
Here is the second tree spawned from the research for Minoso.  Believe it or not, Tim Cullen was also traded for himself.  Even more amazingly, he was traded for Ron Hansen (and others) both times.
February 13, 1968: Ron Hansen traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Washington Senators for Tim Cullen
August 2, 1968: Tim Cullen traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Washington Senators for Ron Hansen.
Cullen’s tree is a bit more expansive than Hansen’s, even reaching down to Bert Blyelven.

Here is the second tree spawned from the research for Minoso.  Believe it or not, Tim Cullen was also traded for himself.  Even more amazingly, he was traded for Ron Hansen (and others) both times.

February 13, 1968: Ron Hansen traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Washington Senators for Tim Cullen
August 2, 1968: Tim Cullen traded by the Chicago White Sox to the Washington Senators for Ron Hansen.

Cullen’s tree is a bit more expansive than Hansen’s, even reaching down to Bert Blyelven.

Thursday, May 12, 2011
You might have noticed in the upper right of yesterday’s Minnie Minoso trade one Ron Hansen.
Hansen was the AL ROY in 1960 for the Orioles.  He garnered 22 of 24 first place votes.  His Baltimore teammates Chuck Estrada and Jim Gentile had one each.
Before the 1968 season, he was traded from the White Sox to the Senators.  In August that year, he was traded back to Chicago.  He spent 1969 with the White Sox before being purchased by the Yankees.

You might have noticed in the upper right of yesterday’s Minnie Minoso trade one Ron Hansen.

Hansen was the AL ROY in 1960 for the Orioles.  He garnered 22 of 24 first place votes.  His Baltimore teammates Chuck Estrada and Jim Gentile had one each.

Before the 1968 season, he was traded from the White Sox to the Senators.  In August that year, he was traded back to Chicago.  He spent 1969 with the White Sox before being purchased by the Yankees.

Monday, May 9, 2011
In researching another tree, which will be up tomorrow, I came across the plight of Paul Giel.  Here is his transaction history from BR.com

June 1, 1961: Traded by the Minnesota Twins with a player to be named later and Reno Bertoia to the Kansas City Athletics for a player to be named later and Bill Tuttle.
June 10, 1961: The Minnesota Twins sent cash to the Kansas City Athletics to complete the trade. The Kansas City Athletics sent Paul Giel to the Minnesota Twins to complete the trade.

Giel was on the Royals for all of 10 days in 1961, appearing in 1 game.  Taking Giel out of the equation, Bertoia and cash were traded for Bill Tuttle.  Tuttle was with the Twins through 1963 before being released.
Not quite Harry Chiti territory, but pretty darn close.

In researching another tree, which will be up tomorrow, I came across the plight of Paul Giel.  Here is his transaction history from BR.com

June 1, 1961: Traded by the Minnesota Twins with a player to be named later and Reno Bertoia to the Kansas City Athletics for a player to be named later and Bill Tuttle.

June 10, 1961: The Minnesota Twins sent cash to the Kansas City Athletics to complete the trade. The Kansas City Athletics sent Paul Giel to the Minnesota Twins to complete the trade.

Giel was on the Royals for all of 10 days in 1961, appearing in 1 game.  Taking Giel out of the equation, Bertoia and cash were traded for Bill Tuttle.  Tuttle was with the Twins through 1963 before being released.

Not quite Harry Chiti territory, but pretty darn close.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011
Awhile back, some anonymous question alerted us that Randy Johnson may have been traded for himself.  It turns out our tipster was correct.
Johnson was traded by the Diamondbacks to the Yankees, only to return to Arizona two years later.   
Chris Owings and Eric Smith are compensation picks for the loss of Juan Cruz.  Owings spent 2009 in Rookie Ball, and 2010 in Low-A.  Smith split ‘09 between Rookie and Low-A, and 2010 between Low- and High-A ball.
Chris Young is still with the organization.  Evan MacLean was traded to St. Louis in 2009 for future considerations.  I could not find who, if anyone, was sent to Arizona in return.  Updates are welcomed.

Awhile back, some anonymous question alerted us that Randy Johnson may have been traded for himself.  It turns out our tipster was correct.

Johnson was traded by the Diamondbacks to the Yankees, only to return to Arizona two years later.   

Chris Owings and Eric Smith are compensation picks for the loss of Juan Cruz.  Owings spent 2009 in Rookie Ball, and 2010 in Low-A.  Smith split ‘09 between Rookie and Low-A, and 2010 between Low- and High-A ball.

Chris Young is still with the organization.  Evan MacLean was traded to St. Louis in 2009 for future considerations.  I could not find who, if anyone, was sent to Arizona in return.  Updates are welcomed.

Wednesday, February 16, 2011
Things are slowly getting back to normal here after our vacation.  Thanks for being patient through the delay.  To get things going again, here is the ultimate Player Traded For Himself - Harry Chiti.
In April, 1962 the Mets acquired Chiti from the Indians for a player to be named later.  Two months later, Chiti was sent from the Mets to the Indians to complete the deal.  However, Chiti never played for the Indians.  He spent two more years at AAA before retiring.

Things are slowly getting back to normal here after our vacation.  Thanks for being patient through the delay.  To get things going again, here is the ultimate Player Traded For Himself - Harry Chiti.

In April, 1962 the Mets acquired Chiti from the Indians for a player to be named later.  Two months later, Chiti was sent from the Mets to the Indians to complete the deal.  However, Chiti never played for the Indians.  He spent two more years at AAA before retiring.

Monday, January 10, 2011
Trade Trees is back after a small holiday break.  Over the next few days, we’ll be showcasing the 2011 Hall of Fame inductees Bert Blyleven and Roberto Alomar.
Blyleven was drafted by the Twins in 1969.  He was traded from Minnesota to the Rangers in 1976.  This would be the first of 5 times Blyleven would be traded throughout his career (Enough to take up this entire week).
Eventually, Blyleven would return to the Twins through this trade, allowing me to use my favorite site tag - “Players Traded For Themselves”. 
Bill Singer was drafted by the Blue Jays in the 1976 Expansion Draft.  Curt Leskanic was drafted by the Rockies in the 1992 Expansion draft.

Trade Trees is back after a small holiday break.  Over the next few days, we’ll be showcasing the 2011 Hall of Fame inductees Bert Blyleven and Roberto Alomar.

Blyleven was drafted by the Twins in 1969.  He was traded from Minnesota to the Rangers in 1976.  This would be the first of 5 times Blyleven would be traded throughout his career (Enough to take up this entire week).

Eventually, Blyleven would return to the Twins through this trade, allowing me to use my favorite site tag - “Players Traded For Themselves”. 

Bill Singer was drafted by the Blue Jays in the 1976 Expansion Draft.  Curt Leskanic was drafted by the Rockies in the 1992 Expansion draft.

Friday, December 10, 2010
Today’s Trade Tree is our first reader submitted proposal.  Take it away, CH:

I’ve got a suggestion for a trade tree which might lead to some tangled and interesting webs.In February 1954 the New York Giants traded Bobby “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” Thompson to the Milwaukee Braves for four players, including former bonus baby Johnny Antonelli, and fifty grand.  Antonelli led the National League in ERA+, won 21 games, and finished third in MVP voting that year, became a six-time All Star, and posted a 108-84 record (124 ERA+) over his Giants career.  Thompson broke his ankle in spring training and only played in 43 games that year.  He must have been injured in 1955, too, because he only played in 101 games.  Thompson’s slash line with Milwaukee was .242/.307/.400/.706, good for only an OPS+ of 92.  His career line was .270/.332/.462/.794 (110 OPS+), including a .277/.337/.484/.821 (116 OPS+) line with the Giants.Another player involved in the deal was Don Liddle, the spot starter who threw the pitch to Vic Wertz in the 1954 World Series which resulted in The Catch.  A season and a half later, the Giants traded Liddle and three other players to the Cardinals for four players, including Red Schoendienst, and a PTBNL.  Barely a year later, Schoendienst was traded to Milwaukee for Bobby Thompson and two other players.  A year later, the Giants again traded Thompson, this time to the Cubs for Bob Speake.What intrigued me about all this is that Thompson, who hit one of the most famous playoff homers of all time, was twice traded by teams which were that year’s eventual World Series Champs.   When I started to realize how many players were involved in these deals, coupled with Thompson’s back and forth act, I figured a Milwaukee Braves/New York Giants/Bobby Thompson trade tee would be a pretty cool thing to see.

CH has suggested a gem for us.  We have another example of a player traded for himself, and there are two more very interesting things.
First, you’ll notice the red line from Dick Littlefield to Jackie Robinson.  This is because Jackie Robinson refused to report to his new team.  The trade was voided and the players returned to their original teams.  This led to Littlefield being traded for Ray Jablonski and Ray Katt instead.  Directly under Katt is our second interesting transaction - Jim King.
BR.com’s transactions for King list an "unknown" transaction that sent him to the Toronto Maple Leafs of the International League.  In his book The Original San Francisco Giants: The Giants of ‘58, Steve Bitker writes:

The Giants worked out a deal with independent Toronto, in the International League, sending Ernie Broglio and Jim King [on loan] in exchange for veteran right-hander Don Johnson, who won 20 games in ‘57 was was named MVP of the [International] league.

Don Johnson was eventually acquired again by the Giants, this time by trading Ray Crone to Toronto, instead of a loan.  Jim King would stay in Toronto, and eventually end up in Cleveland, though I couldn’t nail down how exactly that happened.  BR.com lists the transaction “as part of a minor league working agreement.”  I can’t find any evidence that the Giants received any compensation for King after sending Johnson back to Toronto at the end of 1958.
Any information that can clear up the fate of Jim King would be greatly appreciated.

Today’s Trade Tree is our first reader submitted proposal.  Take it away, CH:

I’ve got a suggestion for a trade tree which might lead to some tangled and interesting webs.

In February 1954 the New York Giants traded Bobby “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” Thompson to the Milwaukee Braves for four players, including former bonus baby Johnny Antonelli, and fifty grand.  Antonelli led the National League in ERA+, won 21 games, and finished third in MVP voting that year, became a six-time All Star, and posted a 108-84 record (124 ERA+) over his Giants career.  Thompson broke his ankle in spring training and only played in 43 games that year.  He must have been injured in 1955, too, because he only played in 101 games.  Thompson’s slash line with Milwaukee was .242/.307/.400/.706, good for only an OPS+ of 92.  His career line was .270/.332/.462/.794 (110 OPS+), including a .277/.337/.484/.821 (116 OPS+) line with the Giants.

Another player involved in the deal was Don Liddle, the spot starter who threw the pitch to Vic Wertz in the 1954 World Series which resulted in The Catch.  A season and a half later, the Giants traded Liddle and three other players to the Cardinals for four players, including Red Schoendienst, and a PTBNL.  Barely a year later, Schoendienst was traded to Milwaukee for Bobby Thompson and two other players.  A year later, the Giants again traded Thompson, this time to the Cubs for Bob Speake.

What intrigued me about all this is that Thompson, who hit one of the most famous playoff homers of all time, was twice traded by teams which were that year’s eventual World Series Champs.   When I started to realize how many players were involved in these deals, coupled with Thompson’s back and forth act, I figured a Milwaukee Braves/New York Giants/Bobby Thompson trade tee would be a pretty cool thing to see.

CH has suggested a gem for us.  We have another example of a player traded for himself, and there are two more very interesting things.

First, you’ll notice the red line from Dick Littlefield to Jackie Robinson.  This is because Jackie Robinson refused to report to his new team.  The trade was voided and the players returned to their original teams.  This led to Littlefield being traded for Ray Jablonski and Ray Katt instead.  Directly under Katt is our second interesting transaction - Jim King.

BR.com’s transactions for King list an "unknown" transaction that sent him to the Toronto Maple Leafs of the International League. In his book The Original San Francisco Giants: The Giants of ‘58, Steve Bitker writes:

The Giants worked out a deal with independent Toronto, in the International League, sending Ernie Broglio and Jim King [on loan] in exchange for veteran right-hander Don Johnson, who won 20 games in ‘57 was was named MVP of the [International] league.

Don Johnson was eventually acquired again by the Giants, this time by trading Ray Crone to Toronto, instead of a loan.  Jim King would stay in Toronto, and eventually end up in Cleveland, though I couldn’t nail down how exactly that happened.  BR.com lists the transaction “as part of a minor league working agreement.”  I can’t find any evidence that the Giants received any compensation for King after sending Johnson back to Toronto at the end of 1958.

Any information that can clear up the fate of Jim King would be greatly appreciated.

Wednesday, December 8, 2010
Olmsted was acquired by the Padres from St. Louis in the initial Fingers trade. Two years later, he was sent back to the Cardinals as the PTBNL in the trade that sent Sixto Lezcano to the Padres.  Sixto Lezcano was, of course, acquired by the Cardinals for when Fingers was sent to Milwaukee.
Viewed from the Cardinals’ point of view, Olmsted was traded for himself:
Olmsted —> Fingers —> Lezcano —> Olmsted
Sound familiar?

Olmsted was acquired by the Padres from St. Louis in the initial Fingers trade. Two years later, he was sent back to the Cardinals as the PTBNL in the trade that sent Sixto Lezcano to the Padres.  Sixto Lezcano was, of course, acquired by the Cardinals for when Fingers was sent to Milwaukee.

Viewed from the Cardinals’ point of view, Olmsted was traded for himself:

Olmsted —> Fingers —> Lezcano —> Olmsted

Sound familiar?

Tuesday, November 2, 2010
Hall of Famer Rickey Henderson has been traded four times in his career.  The first time he was traded, he was sent from Oakland to the New York Yankees in 1984.  Five years later, he was traded back - in essence, Rickey was traded for himself.

Hall of Famer Rickey Henderson has been traded four times in his career.  The first time he was traded, he was sent from Oakland to the New York Yankees in 1984.  Five years later, he was traded back - in essence, Rickey was traded for himself.