Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Anonymous said: Is there anything with Nick Swisher?

Nick Swisher has made two appearances before.  In one, he was a direct product of the Yankees trading Ruben Rivera.  In another, he and Johnny Damon were traded for each other - a fact interesting because Swisher was actually the compensatory draft pick by the A’s for losing Johnny Damon in the first place.  However, he’s the last or near the last step in each of those trees, so there’s not much to add beyond what’s already been done.  Hope that answers your question.

Friday, May 27, 2011
Here’s the tree from yesterday’s request for Ted Lilly.  This tree is his trade from the Dodgers to Montreal Expos.  You’ll definitely see some names here you recognize, like Grudz or Jayson Werth.  Wilton Guerrero is Vlad’s older brother.  And who could forget Hiram Bocachica?  Such a fun name.

Here’s the tree from yesterday’s request for Ted Lilly.  This tree is his trade from the Dodgers to Montreal Expos.  You’ll definitely see some names here you recognize, like Grudz or Jayson Werth.  Wilton Guerrero is Vlad’s older brother.  And who could forget Hiram Bocachica?  Such a fun name.

Tuesday, May 24, 2011
Here’s an updated version of the Holliday tree that shows where people have gone to since the last one, as well as including the other people traded.

Here’s an updated version of the Holliday tree that shows where people have gone to since the last one, as well as including the other people traded.

Monday, May 23, 2011
This is a second, experimental, version of the Lee & Mench tree requested earlier.  In this tree, we’ve included the players traded that weren’t necessarily traceable to the origin.  For example, in this case Podsednik and Hinton are included with Vizcaino in the trade for Carlos Lee.
It give a little more context for what teams are giving up to make these trades, not just what they’re getting in return.  The first version shows a single minor leaguer being traded for Greinke and Betancourt, when the reality is the Brewers gave up much more.
Do the readers like this style, or do you prefer the more minimalist way?
Edit: Spelling update on Alcides Escobar.  Thanks for the assist.

This is a second, experimental, version of the Lee & Mench tree requested earlier.  In this tree, we’ve included the players traded that weren’t necessarily traceable to the origin.  For example, in this case Podsednik and Hinton are included with Vizcaino in the trade for Carlos Lee.

It give a little more context for what teams are giving up to make these trades, not just what they’re getting in return.  The first version shows a single minor leaguer being traded for Greinke and Betancourt, when the reality is the Brewers gave up much more.

Do the readers like this style, or do you prefer the more minimalist way?

Edit: Spelling update on Alcides Escobar.  Thanks for the assist.

Here is the standard Trade Trees style tree for the Brewers dealings with Kevin Mench and Carlos Lee.  Anyone who guessed “Jesus Pena" as being the pater familias needs to either get out more or get a job with Elias.  Pena never pitched for the Brewers.  He signed in the 2001-02 off season and was traded before the 2002 season began.
Getting all the way to Zack Greinke was a pleasant surprise.  Who would have imagined that signing a FA with 48 career appearances would one day net the Brewers a Cy Young winner?

Here is the standard Trade Trees style tree for the Brewers dealings with Kevin Mench and Carlos Lee.  Anyone who guessed “Jesus Pena" as being the pater familias needs to either get out more or get a job with Elias.  Pena never pitched for the Brewers.  He signed in the 2001-02 off season and was traded before the 2002 season began.

Getting all the way to Zack Greinke was a pleasant surprise.  Who would have imagined that signing a FA with 48 career appearances would one day net the Brewers a Cy Young winner?

Wednesday, May 4, 2011
Here is the second* Tommy Davis trade, this one from the Mets to White Sox.  Davis spent one year with Chicago before being selected by the Seattle Pilots in the expansion draft.
Davis would continue to bounce around baseball for 8 more seasons, never spending more than one season at a time in any one place.  Like Howarb said, teams kept trying with Davis hoping he could get back to his early career form, but it unfortunately never happened for him.
*and last (the other two trades feature a combined 4 players.  They just aren’t interesting)

Here is the second* Tommy Davis trade, this one from the Mets to White Sox.  Davis spent one year with Chicago before being selected by the Seattle Pilots in the expansion draft.

Davis would continue to bounce around baseball for 8 more seasons, never spending more than one season at a time in any one place.  Like Howarb said, teams kept trying with Davis hoping he could get back to his early career form, but it unfortunately never happened for him.

*and last (the other two trades feature a combined 4 players.  They just aren’t interesting)

Tuesday, May 3, 2011
Here is the reverse of yesterday’s tree.  This trade is from the point of view of the Dodgers and what they received for Davis.
Pete Mikkelsen pitched 4 years for the Dodgers, going 24-17 in 155 starts.  Jimmie Schaffer was traded from the Reds after 1968 and spent 1969 in AAA Spokane in the Dodgers’ organization before being purchased by the Orioles in 1970.  He never appeared for the Dodgers.  In fact, 1968 was his last major league season.  He left baseball after 1970.

Here is the reverse of yesterday’s tree.  This trade is from the point of view of the Dodgers and what they received for Davis.

Pete Mikkelsen pitched 4 years for the Dodgers, going 24-17 in 155 starts.  Jimmie Schaffer was traded from the Reds after 1968 and spent 1969 in AAA Spokane in the Dodgers’ organization before being purchased by the Orioles in 1970.  He never appeared for the Dodgers.  In fact, 1968 was his last major league season.  He left baseball after 1970.

Monday, May 2, 2011
We were out Friday, so our apologies for getting this up later than we first promised.
This is the trade wherein the Mets first acquired Tommy Davis.

We were out Friday, so our apologies for getting this up later than we first promised.

This is the trade wherein the Mets first acquired Tommy Davis.

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

We received the following comment from a user named Howarb on our Gary Sheffield tree.  We wanted to share it here to make sure everyone saw it.

It will take you back away(1960-70’s) but one of the best pure right handed hitter’s that I ever saw was named Tommy Davis. He began his career with the LA Dodgers actually in 1959 but had two monster seasons in 1962-63 hitting -.346 and .326 respectfully. In the 1962 campaign he had 230 hits and drove in 153 runs. As a boy I truly believed that he would be in Cooperstown. Unfortunately, as the case with many others, he had bad knee’s and would never shine as bright. I was a young Met’s fan in 1967 when they traded their up and coming 2B Ron Hunt (the man that was hit by many pitches) for Brooklyn born Tommy D. If you start a tree for Tommy Davis, I would be delighted. Before you start you must consider that at on time he was the most traded player in baseball history. I don’t know if the record still stand’s but every team hoped that they would catch lighting in a bottle and 1962 and a healthy Tommy D. would emerge. With my best regards, Howarb

We’d be happy to do some Tommy Davis trees.  We’ll start with the Ron Hunt-Tommy Davis trade you mentioned, from the point of view of the Mets.  Then we’ll do some of the other Tommy Davis trees.