Tuesday, July 5, 2011
The answer to this morning’s clue*, and today’s tree, is Al “The Mad Hungarian” Hrabosky.  The tree itself isn’t too interesting, though it does include future MLB manager Buck Martinez.  This tree was mostly posted because of Hrabosky’s awesome nickname.
Can you imagine someone being nicknamed that today?  Manny “The Daffy Dominican” Ramierez? Jason “The Crazy Canuck” Bay?
Hrabosky can be heard these days on FSN Midwest broadcasts of Cardinals games.
*Congrats to Obit Of The Day for being the only correct answer.

The answer to this morning’s clue*, and today’s tree, is Al “The Mad Hungarian” Hrabosky.  The tree itself isn’t too interesting, though it does include future MLB manager Buck Martinez.  This tree was mostly posted because of Hrabosky’s awesome nickname.

Can you imagine someone being nicknamed that today?  Manny “The Daffy Dominican” Ramierez? Jason “The Crazy Canuck” Bay?

Hrabosky can be heard these days on FSN Midwest broadcasts of Cardinals games.

*Congrats to Obit Of The Day for being the only correct answer.

Wednesday, May 25, 2011
Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda was Rookie of the Year in 1958 for the San Francisco Giants and MVP for the Cardinals in 1967, as well as being a 7-time All Star.  Over his 17 seasons, he played for 6 teams (SF, STL, ATL, OAK, BOS, and KCR).
The first time he was traded was from San Francisco to St. Louis for Ray Sadecki.  After 2+ years in St. Louis, during which he won his MVP, Cepeda was traded again, this time to the Braves for Joe Torre.  Ray Sadeki would end up back in St. Louis after Torre was traded away.

Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda was Rookie of the Year in 1958 for the San Francisco Giants and MVP for the Cardinals in 1967, as well as being a 7-time All Star.  Over his 17 seasons, he played for 6 teams (SF, STL, ATL, OAK, BOS, and KCR).

The first time he was traded was from San Francisco to St. Louis for Ray Sadecki.  After 2+ years in St. Louis, during which he won his MVP, Cepeda was traded again, this time to the Braves for Joe Torre.  Ray Sadeki would end up back in St. Louis after Torre was traded away.

Monday, April 4, 2011
This is the biggest tree we’ve done so far, on par the Goose Gossage tree.  This one has 11 generations and 42 resultant players from Enos Slaughter.  Gossage had 10 generations and 42 players.
Slaughter was traded from the Cardinals to the Yankees in 1954.  The last player I saw in this tree to be playing was Lou Brock in 1979 - a 25 year span.  Slaughter, himself a Hall of Famer, spawned two more in Hoyt Wilhelm and Lou Brock.  While Brock is known mostly as a Cardinal, Wilhelm only spent part of 1957 there before being claimed off of waivers by the Indians.

This is the biggest tree we’ve done so far, on par the Goose Gossage tree.  This one has 11 generations and 42 resultant players from Enos Slaughter.  Gossage had 10 generations and 42 players.

Slaughter was traded from the Cardinals to the Yankees in 1954.  The last player I saw in this tree to be playing was Lou Brock in 1979 - a 25 year span.  Slaughter, himself a Hall of Famer, spawned two more in Hoyt Wilhelm and Lou Brock.  While Brock is known mostly as a Cardinal, Wilhelm only spent part of 1957 there before being claimed off of waivers by the Indians.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011
Bob Uecker is known for, in rough order, being an annoucer for the Brewers, begin Harry Doyle on Major League and on “Mr. Belvedere”, and being a catcher (and a bad one if you hear him tell it).  He played 6 years split among the Milwaukee Braves, Cardinals, Phillies, and the Braves again, this time in Atlanta.
I could bore you with the stats of all the players in this tree, but your time would be better used reading these quotes from Uecker.

Bob Uecker is known for, in rough order, being an annoucer for the Brewers, begin Harry Doyle on Major League and on “Mr. Belvedere”, and being a catcher (and a bad one if you hear him tell it).  He played 6 years split among the Milwaukee Braves, Cardinals, Phillies, and the Braves again, this time in Atlanta.

I could bore you with the stats of all the players in this tree, but your time would be better used reading these quotes from Uecker.

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
Here is the second tree from yesterday’s slight detour down Pedantry Lane.
Lance Clemons was sent from the Houston Astros to St. Louis Cardinals in 1972.  A reliever with St. Louis, Clemons pitched 5.1 innings over 3 games, giving up 8 hits and 6 earned runs.  During 1972, he also appeared in 21 games (all starts) for the Cardinals’ AAA affiliate in Tulsa.  He was traded to the Red Sox after 1 year with St. Louis.  For his career, Clemons appeared in 19 games in 3 seasons with 3 different teams.

Here is the second tree from yesterday’s slight detour down Pedantry Lane.

Lance Clemons was sent from the Houston Astros to St. Louis Cardinals in 1972.  A reliever with St. Louis, Clemons pitched 5.1 innings over 3 games, giving up 8 hits and 6 earned runs.  During 1972, he also appeared in 21 games (all starts) for the Cardinals’ AAA affiliate in Tulsa.  He was traded to the Red Sox after 1 year with St. Louis.  For his career, Clemons appeared in 19 games in 3 seasons with 3 different teams.

Friday, December 24, 2010
This is the second Matt Holliday trade.  Again, this one is upside-down, showing the people the Cardinals needed in order to eventually get Holliday.

This is the second Matt Holliday trade.  Again, this one is upside-down, showing the people the Cardinals needed in order to eventually get Holliday.

Wednesday, December 15, 2010
Rogers Hornsby won two Triple Crowns - 1922 and 1925.  A year after his second, he was traded to the NY Giants.  Hornsby would be traded twice more in the next two years (I may get around to those as well).  The interesting thing about this trade is that Hornsby, a future HOFer, was traded for TWO future HOFers, Frisch and Ring.  I wonder if there’s another tree out there that includes 3+ HOF players?  Hopefully our upcoming updates will make that a lot easier to find out.

Rogers Hornsby won two Triple Crowns - 1922 and 1925.  A year after his second, he was traded to the NY Giants.  Hornsby would be traded twice more in the next two years (I may get around to those as well).  The interesting thing about this trade is that Hornsby, a future HOFer, was traded for TWO future HOFers, Frisch and Ring.  I wonder if there’s another tree out there that includes 3+ HOF players?  Hopefully our upcoming updates will make that a lot easier to find out.

Wednesday, December 8, 2010
Olmsted was acquired by the Padres from St. Louis in the initial Fingers trade. Two years later, he was sent back to the Cardinals as the PTBNL in the trade that sent Sixto Lezcano to the Padres.  Sixto Lezcano was, of course, acquired by the Cardinals for when Fingers was sent to Milwaukee.
Viewed from the Cardinals’ point of view, Olmsted was traded for himself:
Olmsted —> Fingers —> Lezcano —> Olmsted
Sound familiar?

Olmsted was acquired by the Padres from St. Louis in the initial Fingers trade. Two years later, he was sent back to the Cardinals as the PTBNL in the trade that sent Sixto Lezcano to the Padres.  Sixto Lezcano was, of course, acquired by the Cardinals for when Fingers was sent to Milwaukee.

Viewed from the Cardinals’ point of view, Olmsted was traded for himself:

Olmsted —> Fingers —> Lezcano —> Olmsted

Sound familiar?